Hello and welcome back to Tie-lopnik, rated the #1 post about ties on Oppositelock since last Monday! As always, we will do a new knot today, and here are the ones we have already learned about:

Shelby:

Four-in-Hand:

Trinity:

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Double Windsor:

Prince Albert/ Van Wijk:

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Half Windsor:

Eldredge:

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Kelvin:

Today, I'm doing one that I have honestly never worn before, the Balthus knot. Also known as the "why is that knot so big" knot, it's the largest knot I've ever worn. Its basically a quadruple windsor + a dose of steroids. It uses a lot of fabric, and it turns out huge, symmetrical, very wide, triangular, and imposing. I won't hide my feelings—- I don't like this knot. Let me tell you why: Firstly, who looks at a double windsor and thinks, "Nice, but I wish it was twice as big!"? Secondly, like I said this knot uses a ton of fabric, so it's pretty much impossible for a tall person, even with a long tie. That leaves short people (like me), who will be absolutely dwarfed by the size of the knot. So I don't really know who it's for. In any case, it's roughly the size of Texas, so be bold and try it out!

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(Note- I tied this one incredibly tight, to make it as small as possible, because I do have to wear it all day in my office. Even so, it's big. Tied looser, it's gargantuan.)

Balthus:

Advantages: When you absolutely positively must have the biggest knot in the room, you can loosen the tie a little and use it like a table that is attached to your neck, you can take the tie off altogether and use it like a silken mace/flail to fend off intruders

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Disadvantages: Nobody needs a knot this big, looks funny on the only people that can wear it (short people), a novelty knot if ever there was one, your tie knot will get searched in airport security because it's actually large enough to smuggle things in