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UPDATE!

Yes, my friends, we have a roof!

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My weekend wasn’t all curb cleaning and sunburns. I wrapped up the roof and got started on the doors. My wife is waffling on the siding, so we took a trip to the big box lumber yard to peruse some options. I was looking forward to the quick-and-easy vinyl to match the back of the house, but now she’s thinking board and batten. I’m not opposed to that if I can get her to consider the cheap-and-easy-to-hang vinyl version.

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The real-deal wood version is expensive.

I’m thinking if you can’t tell the difference from 10 feet, what does it matter? I doubt we’ll stay in this house another five years and people down here are happy with vinyl. If it isn’t our “forever” home, why spend the money and deal with the added maintenance of real wood siding?

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We have some time to make that decision. I’ll get the doors done in the meantime to finish drying-in the structure.

Speaking of doors, the instructions in the kit suggest using pocket screws to join together 2x4s to make the frame. I’m not too happy with that option, especially on a moving part which is subject to some abuse. Since I have the space to work, I set up my table saw and started cutting half-lap joints. I don’t have a fancy dado blade, so it’s taking a bit longer, but the practice joints fit together perfectly.

The top and bottom of the first door were easy since they were only 3 feet long. The next challenge is cutting the half-lap on the sides. Those will be over 7 feet long, so supporting the far end while I make the cuts is going to be tricky.

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As I watch videos like these, I definitely feel some hardware envy. I’m working with an old Ryobi 10" saw similar to this:

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Mine doesn’t even have the extendable table like this one. Because the tolerances are a bit loose, it’s easy to get the fence misaligned and not parallel to the blade. That’s dangerous because it can cause binding and kickback. The miter gauge doesn’t have a snug fit, so it’s easy to make a cut that isn’t perfectly square (or whatever angle you’re trying to cut).

Those shortcomings led me to a whole bunch of videos on improving your table saw with things like an improved fence and a cross-cut sled. Of course, you can just buy those upgrades, but why buy when you can build them? I can see that this is one deep rabbit hole I’ve fallen into.

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