(UPDATE) Besides not being a mechanic, but trying to be one anyway - What am I doing wrong?

As we last left our incompetent shade tree mechanic:

Besides not being a mechanic, but trying to be one anyway - What am I doing wrong?

I am back to work, so free time is limited. Weather has been bad. Finally got a chance today in this “how did the temperature jump 20+ degrees in a day?” weather to try the “try heating it up and over-lubing the shaft” idea.

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Removed the serpentine belt. Easy enough.

Try to remove the pulley to heat it up. Same “clicking as opposed to applying sufficient force” problem as before.

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Try to use a pry bar on the back to assist it as I used the puller and:

Illustration for article titled (UPDATE) Besides not being a mechanic, but trying to be one anyway - What am I doing wrong?
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Damn it.

Don’t care about the pulley. It’s 20 years old. Cheap and in stock locally. Probably was the source of the problem to begin with. But now I went from a squealing accessory belt to an inoperable car, and I cannot get the pulley’s remains off to try to install a new one.

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So, assuming the massively overpriced AutoZone pulley puller is insufficient to get the job done, what tool do I need? Any recommendations for a professional level tool?

Or is there some “as a mechanic for 30 years, the secret trick is ____” answer that I don’t know about?

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Thank you!

On a side note, the rest of the restoration has gone well. Was caught a bit off guard by the price of a replacement key. Apparently Ford used security chips in the keys of their 2000 base model Mustangs. So what I was expecting to be a $3 replacement cost me $70. No big deal, but would have been nice to know when I was negotiating the sale price. MAF and throttle body cleaned easy enough. Headlights buffed out nice and look solid with replacement bulbs. Trunk struts replaced. New tires arrived - just need to get them mounted. The $500 restoration budget is getting iffy if I can’t fix the power steering issue, but other than that, it’s (hopefully) just fixing an exhaust leak (I imagine it’s one exhaust header - common problem), a bit of exterior touch-up, and changing any neglected fluids plus SeaFoam fuel treatment and it should be solid runner.

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But all of the easy to work on, cheap to replace parts, etc. benefits get negated with one bad engineering choice in the power steering pump pulley. Just bolt it to the pump. Or have a bolt connect the pulley to the rod and use a cotter pin. Ford’s solution is more complicated and less safe while providing zero benefit. I have to assume it was for cost, but then every mechanic needs to buy a more expensive pulley remover/installer kit, causing more expense in the big picture (albeit not to Ford).

Illustration for article titled (UPDATE) Besides not being a mechanic, but trying to be one anyway - What am I doing wrong?

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