The IAA is not like the SEMA. Everyone can attend it. And, seemingly, there’s a vast amount of people who happily spent 16€ to walk across halls and plazas filled with commercial displays. Well, I am one of them. Here is a short tale of my very normal IAA day.

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Car show’s parking spaces can be an attraction theirselves. At IAA, they are giantic and very well organised. You get to the show’s entrance quickly with buses arriving every other minute. But to go car spotting there is not a very fulfilling task. You’ll see about, what you see passing by on the autobahn. That is understandable, as the IAA has long left the usual “special interest” area car shows are stuck in sometimes and everyone who’s got a bit of interest goes there. But that’s not to say, that there is no occasional flavor thrown in. Next to our spot was an about 20-year old Daewoo Tigo (roughly Daihatsu Move-shaped, if that helps) with romainian numberplates. The owner must’ve been driven from there, heroic indeed.

There was no hint of the masses at the ticket counters, but as I stood in the first exhibition hall, hall 11 or BMW-hall, I certainly became a taste of the number of people around.

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To be greeted by the new Siebener is a quite nice kind of beginning. But I would have liked its to design to be a bit more i-inspiredly futuristic, matching its groundbreaking carbon parts chassis.

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We went through there quite fast, as you had no real chance of getting close to the interesting vehicles. A 2-Series Active Tourer is not interesting. As is the new X1.

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Rolls-Royce is one of the brands that keeps you away from their cars. No chance trying the orange leather yourself. Other brands, especially the VAG luxury car makers do not just let people whose look just screams NOVEAU RICHE! in your face touch their cars. But you got to be lucky anyway.

So what I concentrated on was to get a look at the spaces, that aren’t shown on Autoblog, those little niches in between the big brands.

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So, let’ show you something positiveish:

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A Mitsubishi Outlander rally car. It’ll be driven somewhere in Portugal, but the fact, that Mitsu is involved in ralling is just great. I’d be not so mad at them anymore, if an Outlander with this bodykit replaces the Evolution.

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I never was one to dig the Subaru XV, but this particular show car just seemed very right. Though I doubt you can order it with that profile from the dealer. The Levorg also impressed me much. It is considerably inexpensive and though the interior quality is not BMW or VW level, it feels sportive and induvidual.

A display with Tomica toy cars is something you can only find adorable.

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If the Gripz Concept wasn’t what it is, It could be a really working concept. For now, I see it as Threat for all sportscar-lovers.

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From the IAA two years ago, I knew, that seeing the Mercedes and Audi displays would be hard. And we did not see them. Audi has a moveable building in front of which a long queue had assembled. Over speakers, they announced the estimated waiting time. 20 minutes. Getting into the Mercedes-only hall was nearly impossible. after 10 meteres we were stuck with about 250 other people waiting to be allowed to go upwards the three floors. I turned around both times.

More time to spend with the Susuki Baleno

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It really left a positive impression with me and was my surprise of the show.

Japan’s finest engineering might be what the Prius is bought for, but I see its new rear design as a sculptural work of art

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There were two cars that I was daring to see this year and fortunately they were located in the same. One was the new Borgward and the other one - the Alfa Romeo Giulia.

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Well, its design not really has induvidual character and they did not make it possible to take a seat. Meh.

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Illustration for article titled What You Experience Visiting The IAA The Plebeian Way

But the Giulia was just as fine as I hoped. The Alfa booth was not as large as others, but its concept with a panoranic screen was very impressing. Alfa would let you get close, but there once again was a queue for the short follow-me-around. Maybe I should have waited those minutes...

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Illustration for article titled What You Experience Visiting The IAA The Plebeian Way

Ferrari was a no-go area for me, too. It was surrounded by a glass wall, as the entire Aston Martin, Brabus and Mansory booths, too. Not that I missed the last two.

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Last stop was the VAG hall. You know, with Porsche. They even had a Cayman GT4 there. And the new 911, of course.

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Great was this Skoda fabia Wagon built to rally standard. Yeah, great is apropriate.

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Before I leave you with some Ford GT for good measure, I may introduce myself. I had posted some things under the name smultron some time ago, but eventually lost my password. So here I am, brand new.

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