This video attempted to clarify it, but I’m still a bit lost. Did I miss something part-way through, or is there a better explanation out there?

I admit it, I’m one of many who has fallen into the trap of using these terms interchangeably. I was excited to see Car Throttle devote a whole video to the topic, but I’m coming away from it, well, less than satisfied. Maybe I’ll have a better understanding of it by the time I finish putting my thoughts together and typing it all out, but I’m gonna hit “publish” anyway so that I can hear your opinions on the matter.

“...drifting is everything you do on the way into a corner, and powersliding is what happens after the apex...”

Okay, so this seems to be the core statement from which the video is built around. But as concise as it sounds, I feel like it’s coming at this whole thing from the wrong... er, angle.

Powersliding is simple enough. You initiate a turn, apply “too much” POWER, which forces the rear wheels to break traction, then you maintain course by counter-steering while modulating the throttle to keep the car SLIDING at an angle.

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Wikipedia defines drifting as being all about slip angles, whatever your technique. You can pull the handbrake to lock the rear wheels, you can kick the clutch to “shock” them with torque, you can suddenly lift off of the throttle to shift weight away from the rear... Any one of these actions can help induce oversteer.

Isn’t powersliding just another technique for achieving drift?

To throw another wrench in the works, am I confusing drifting & oversteering? Oversteering is when the body of the car turns beyond the steering input of the driver. Okay, fine. But is it even possible to oversteer without causing the rear wheels to slip at a drift-like angle? Despite their technical definitions, are drifting and oversteering inseparable?

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Back to the Car Throttle definitions:

“...drifting is everything you do on the way into a corner, and powersliding is what happens after the apex...”

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What if there’s no corner, no apex? What if you’re in the middle of a parking lot or a frozen lake, and you make the car move in the exact same way?

The degree of car rotation at each point throughout the turn can change depending on the technique employed. But I don’t see how these minor variations can disqualify the maneuver from being classified as drifting.

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Thoughts?