I took this photo (along with many other which are attached below), which didn't come out as well as I had imagined the frame in my mind, but you can only expect so much from a kit lens hooked up with a entry level dslr

Nikon with auto-focus sensors blown out with the dust in the heavily dusty environment.

This isn't a great picture by any means and I took it in spur of the moment as the congregation of photographers suddenly aimed their lenses towards the approaching camel like a soldier would aim towards an incoming enemy. I followed suit and tried a different frames from others despite not having my favorite lens for landscape and automotive and everything else; the 10-22 lens.

This is all to irrelevant to the point of my writing, but what makes this picture great in my eyes is the story of this man and those of his village.

As big as the mountain behind him, the poverty in which this man's village lives for days is literally like stepping into hundreds of years behind us. This man had left his village a day ago just as the rain stopped to get supplies for his village and at this point, he's completed 70% of his journey and, to-and-back the time on camels it takes them is roughly three days.

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We could go back and forth a dozen time in just one day yet! We couldn't come close to his village that day because of rain converting the sand into clay. Sticky clay so no matter how hard we tried. It got worse. Rocking, winching, brute force, pushing, it was all too a tiring effort to even go past and yet crossed but instantly, we presented with this river bed.

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The river bed was no problem for his camel but all our engineering and techniques failed at that moment and decided to put up camp and go back.

Nevertheless, that lot is a proud one. The most hospitable and loving people tarred by years of restlessness, they haven't moved an inch and now, they've embraced this lifestyle as divine and not move forward.

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Listening to this men tell that your cars won't make it to where you want to go as I've been on that path since last night, it raised all hairs on my body.

And looking at the majestic valleys in which these folks live, I wonder, will man built false paradise are better than what they have already?! Sure, basic facilities are available including a lot of sex, and convenience but the main thing above all, the peace of mind isn't there.

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There wasn't any point but the peace of mind, despite being stuck endlessly with dirty clothes and all that, the peace of mind is so overwhelming that you can reflect on yourself and think about everything with boundless patience. That is the point of me writing this, which doesn't carry any particular premise rather how I felt in the valley of Hingol.

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To me, the whole area was the natural set of Mordor. And one just can't enter Mordor is rather true as we headed back out towards the beach to clean up and relax under the most beautiful of sunsets.

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